Marathon Training During Coronavirus

Marathon Training During Coronavirus

There’s nothing quite like spring marathon season. After months of slogging through long runs on cold and dark mornings, the weather starts to warm up, the sun rises earlier, and your goal race is finally within sight. Your hard work finally pays off when you get to toe the line and 26.2 miles later you (hopefully) get to celebrate your race with your friends and family. But most spring marathoners have been robbed of their day in the sun by the coronavirus this year. And while the ongoing pandemic obviously has consequences that are far more important than a marathon, it has been a disruption for thousands of runners this year. Whether you were planning to run your first marathon this spring or if you were fulfilling an annual tradition by running your favorite race, coronavirus has undoubtedly disrupted your plans. Luckily for runners, our favorite activity is something that we can still do as long as we maintain physical distance while we’re on the go. And running has been shown to be a great way to maintain your mental and physical health during this stressful time. Despite the disruption to your marathon training plan, you can still use this newfound time to become a better runner. With a lack of upcoming races and uncertainty about the summer and fall racing season, it’s the perfect time to keep running while mixing in some different types of training that many marathon runners neglect when they’re in the middle of high mileage training. Here are ShoeKicker’s tips for how marathon runners should train while their schedule is disrupted by the coronavirus:

Number 3

Speed training

Speed training

If you’re like many marathoners, this might sound like blasphemy. You’re most comfortable grinding through the tough middle portion of a 20-miler to ready for marathon pace. But the uncertainty of the current racing schedule makes this the perfect time to work on your weaknesses so that you’re ready to fly when it’s time to train for a marathon again. Speed training will help you build leg strength, improve your running form, and help you run more efficiently, which will make marathon pace feel like a walk in the park. This newfound speed will have tremendous physiological and psychological benefits. You will be more efficient when running at marathon pace and taking a few seconds off your typical pace will feel less intimidating when you’re used to training faster. Kicking off your speed training will be easier if you have the right shoes. Lighter, more responsive shoes will help you get moving on your speed days by making it easier to land on your midfoot without holding you back. Check out a few of ShoeKicker’s favorite shoes for speed training here:

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Number 2

Trail running

Trail running

Many marathoners stick to the roads because it makes it easier to monitor your pace as you dial in your goal pace. But now is a great time to break up your typical routine by taking your runs to the trails to become a more well-rounded runner. Trail running can help you build better balance and strength in your legs by forcing you to adjust to varied terrain. It’s also a great way to practice physical distancing by getting away from crowded roads and sidewalks while taking in beautiful views. Trail running requires a shoe that can handle rocks, roots, and dirt to prevent you from slipping and sliding while you’re enjoying your time off the roads. Trail shoes come in a wide range of styles, so there is definitely something that will fit your style whether it’s flying up and down technical trails, or spending hours getting lost in your favorite park. Check out a few of Shoekicker’s favorite trail running shoe here:

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or get it on Amazon

Number 1

Strength Training

Strength Training

Marathon runners tend to have a love/hate relationship with strength training. Some enjoy the unique challenge and how increased strength can help them maintain their form in the late stages of a long race. But many others consider it a time-consuming nuisance with marginal benefits for long distance runners. Regardless of where you stand on strength training, it’s undeniable that the current uncertainty in the racing calendar makes it an excellent time to work on your weaknesses. Strength training during your marathon off-season can be extremely helpful in the long run by increasing your resistance to injury and helping you run with excellent form when your body is tired. Even though most gyms are closed, runners can develop a strength training habit at home using bodyweight exercises or a basic set of bands or weights. As you look for a strength training program that works for you, it may be worth investing in an all-around cross training shoe to give you the lateral support and stability that traditional running shoes lack. Check out our favorite cross training shoe as you build your strength training program:

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or get it on Amazon